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Posts Tagged ‘Peas’

From: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Orzo-and-Herbed-Sugar-Snap-Peas-106376

Time:  15 minutes

Servings: 6

 

Ingredients

  • 10 cups water
  • 2 cups low-sodium fat-free chicken broth
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 pound sugar snap peas, trimmed and cut diagonally into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 scallions, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
  • 1 1/3 cups orzo (1/2 pound)
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

 

Directions

Bring water, broth, and 1 teaspoon salt to a boil and blanch sugar snaps 1 minute. Transfer sugar snaps with a slotted spoon to a bowl of cold water to stop cooking, reserving broth, then drain sugar snaps in a colander. Put sugar snaps, scallions, and dill in a bowl.

Return broth to a boil and cook orzo, stirring occasionally, until tender. Reserve 1/2 cup broth, then drain orzo in a sieve. Add hot orzo to sugar snap mixture along with pepper and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and toss, adding some of reserved broth if pasta seems dry.

 

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From: Bon Apetit, http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/2012/06/roast-salmon-with-miso-glaze-and-sugar-snap-peas

Servings: 4

Salmon that has not been previously frozen roasts best. If you use salmon fillets with the skin still on, cook them skin side down.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil plus more for brushing
  • 1/4 cup good-quality teriyaki sauce
  • 1/4 cup white miso (fermented soybean paste)
  • 2 scallions, green and white parts separated, finely chopped
  • 4 6-ounce salmon fillets (about 1 1/2-inch thick)
  • 12 ounces sugar snap peas, trimmed, stringed
  • Kosher salt
  • Ingredient Info:

    White miso, also known as shiro miso, is available in the refrigerated Asian foods section of some supermarkets and at natural foods stores and Japanese markets.

Preparation

  • Arrange racks in upper and lower thirds of oven and preheat to 450°. Brush 2 large rimmed baking sheets with oil. Purée teriyaki sauce, miso, and white parts of scallions in a blender on low speed until smooth. Arrange salmon fillets on a prepared baking sheet. Spread miso mixture over salmon, dividing evenly. Roast salmon on top rack until almost cooked through, about 7 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, toss 1 Tbsp. oil and sugar snap peas on remaining baking sheet and season with salt. Roast peas on bottom rack until crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Transfer salmon to plates and sprinkle with green parts of scallions. Divide peas among plates.

Read More http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/2012/06/roast-salmon-with-miso-glaze-and-sugar-snap-peas#ixzz2Wovy9oWC

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From: Bon Appetit, http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/2011/04/pea_and_radish_salad_with_goat_cheese

Prep Time: 35 minutes

Servings: 4

 

Ingredients

vinaigrette

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon hazelnut oil
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • Fine sea salt

vegtables

  • 1 cup shelled fresh peas (from about 1 pound peas in pods) or frozen peas
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen shelled edamame
  • 1 cup sugar snap peas, stringed
  • 1 tablespoon hazelnut oil
  • 1 1/2 cups pea sprouts or pea tendrils
  • 4 red radishes, trimmed, thinly sliced
  • 1 5- to 6-ounce package soft fresh goat cheese, crumbled
  • ingredient info

    Pea sprouts and pea tendrils can be found at some farmers’ markets and at natural foods stores and Asian markets.

Directions

vinaigrette

  • Whisk both oils, vinegar, and mustard in small bowl to blend. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill. Return to room temperature and rewhisk before using.

vegetables

  • Cook peas, edamame, and snap peas in separate batches in large saucepan of boiling salted water until tender, about 4 minutes for fresh peas and 2 minutes for frozen peas, 4 minutes for edamame, and 1 minute for snap peas. Using slotted spoon or skimmer, transfer vegetables to large bowl of ice water to cool, then drain well and transfer to medium bowl. Drizzle hazelnut oil over; toss to coat. DO AHEAD Can be made 6 hours ahead. Cover; chill.
  • Divide pea mixture among plates. Scatter sprouts, sliced radishes, and crumbled goat cheese over. Sprinkle with freshly ground black pepper. Drizzle vinaigrette over and serve.

Read More http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/2011/04/pea_and_radish_salad_with_goat_cheese#ixzz2Wov6HQf7

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Sauteed Sugar Snap Peas

From:  Ina Garten, http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/sauteed-sugar-snap-peas-recipe/index.html

Prep Time:  15 min

Cook Time: 5 min

Servings: 6

Ingredients

1 1/2 pounds fresh sugar snap peas
1 tablespoon good olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Sea salt or fleur de sel, for serving

Directions
Remove and discard the stem end and string from each sugar snap pod.

Heat the olive oil in a large saute pan over medium-high heat. Add the sugar snap peas, salt and pepper and saute, tossing occasionally for 3 to 5 minutes, until the sugar snap peas are crisp tender.

Place the sugar snap peas in a serving bowl, sprinkle with sea salt and serve.

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/sauteed-sugar-snap-peas-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

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First Sprouts

first-batch-of-peas

This doesn’t look like much yet, but it’s our first planting of peas!  What you can actually see in the photo are the lines of oats.  The peas are planted next to each line of oats, and are just beginning to germinate.  I’ll snap a close-up photo of the peas soon (i’m having issues with my camera)…  The oats grow faster than the peas, and will serve as a natural trellis for the peas.  These are bush peas–one shelling variety, and one sugar snap variety–which means they don’t grow much higher than three feet.  The oats will keep them off the ground, make it easier to harvest the peas, and will save us a ton of time and effort.  These were planted about a week and a half ago–it’s such a relief to find them sprouting!

To the right of the peas are fava beans.    They are just beginning to germinate–one here, another there.  I haven’t had the heart to weed them yet (see all the dandelions?).  I’d rather wait until the roots are a little more established, and I can see the rows better.  Don’t want to risk pulling them out!  Fava beans are another name for broad beans.  They are harvested by the pod, and the beans inside remind me of lima beans.  They are an Italian favorite.  If you’ve never heard of them, don’t worry–you’ll get a fact sheet with recipes and other info at distribution.  In the meantime, just google “Fava Bean.”

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